Know Your Genes: APOA2 “Weight Gain Gene”
August 2, 2017
Know Your Genes: AGT “Salt Sensitivity Gene”
August 6, 2017

Know Your Genes: ADIPOQ “Fat Burn Hormone Gene”

The Adiponectin (ADIPOQ) gene is associated with the synthesis of Adiponectin, a hormone found to be associated with regulating the level of glucose and in the fatty acid breakdown. This hormone is secreted by the adipose tissue into the blood stream after which it enters the liver cells and the muscle, where it is found to be associated with fat burn and glucose utilization. People with A variant of the gene were shown to be associated with higher serum adiponectin levels.

When the level of the hormone is decreased, there is found to be decreased fat burn and glucose utilization which can lead to weight gain and increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

Association with MUFA intake and Weight Gain:

In a study conducted on 1083 individuals, people with the A variant were found to be associated with lower weight, BMI and waist to hip circumference.  Obesity risk among such individuals was further reduced on higher MUFA intake (>13%). In the same study it was found that individuals with the G variant weighed 2 kg more than people with the G variant when MUFA intake was high.

Association with Tendency to Regain Weight:

In a study conducted on Spanish volunteers who were on a low calorie diet, the increased risk for obesity which was earlier found to be associated with G variants of the gene did not exist. However, after 32-60 weeks people with the G variant were shown to be associated with weight regain, though people with the A variant were found to be protected from weight regain.

 

Association with Type II Diabetes:

In a study conducted on 2200 South Indian population, People with the G variant were shown to be associated with central obesity and the risk for type 2 diabetes was mediated through obesity.

 

Genotype

Rs17300539

Phenotype

Recommendations

AA

[Advantage] More likely to have higher adiponectin levels

[Advantage] More likely to have a lower risk for obesity

[Advantage] More likely to have a lower risk for type 2 diabetes

  • Though your genetic type is associated with lower risk for obesity, other factors could increase the risk for obesity like sedentary job or poor dietary habits.
  • Increase MUFA intake to further lower obesity risk
  • Foods that are rich in MUFA are olive oil, avocado oil, canola oil, olives, almonds, macadamia nuts and nut butters
AG

[Advantage]More likely to have moderate adiponectin levels

[Advantage] More likely to have moderate risk for obesity

GG

[Limitation] More likely to have lower adiponectin levels

[Limitation] More likely to have higher risk for obesity

[Limitation] More likely to have higher risk for type 2 diabetes

  • Restrict intake of fat in the diet
  • Consume low glycemic index(GI) food than high glycemic index food
  • Foods that are low in GI are barley, whole grain bread, chickpea, fish, broccoli, beans and ragi

 

References:

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19238139
  2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adiponectin
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18949681
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=24055485

Related Links:

  1. https://www.xcode.in/dna-and-health/obesity-the-growing-concern
  2. https://www.xcode.in/dna-and-nutrition/overweight-and-obesity-genes-are-also-involved

 

Find out which variation of the gene you carry and more at www.xcode.in

“Nutrigenetics, fitness genetics, health genetics are all nascent but rapidly growing areas within human genetics. The information provided herein is based on preliminary scientific studies and it is to be read and understood in that context.”

Amrita Surendranath
Amrita Surendranath
Amrita has a Masters in Human Genetics which fuelled her passion for genes and their diktats. She loves converting genetic research into exciting scientific news with a punch. 10 years on, her interesting insights have covered a range of topics that include cancer, diabetes, nutrition, fitness and more. A pulse on what’s interesting aids in decoding laboratory data into useful science that could empower people into molding healthier lifestyles.