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Know Your Genes: CD36 “Fat Tasting Gene”

The Cluster of Differentiation (CD36) gene is associated with the synthesis of CD36 protein, also known as the fatty acid translocase protein, an integral membrane protein, is present on the surface of many cells. People with certain variants of the gene are associated with fatty taste perception and low vitamin E levels.

The protein CD36 belongs to the Class B Scavenger receptor. This class of protein is associated with receptors for selective cholesteryl ester uptake. There are four SNPs of CD36 that are included in our report- rs1984112, rs1527483, rs1761667 and rs1527479.

Association with Tendency to Overeat Fatty Foods:

Orosensory perception varies from one individual to another, which is shown to be associated with the nutritional status of the individual. The ability to taste fatty foods is found to be significantly associated with dietary fat detection, with long chain fatty acids being primarily responsible for fatty acids detection in the oral cavity.

In a study conducted to identify the ability to detect oleic acid by orosensory perception, people with the G variant of the gene (rs1761667) were shown to be associated with better fat taste perception and people with the C variant of the gene (rs1527483) were shown to be associated with four fold lower threshold for oleic acid than non-tasters. In a similar study conducted to identify fat taste perception of Italian salad dressing people with the G variant of the gene (rs1761667) reported greater perceived creaminess and people with the T variant of the gene (rs1527483) were shown to perceive greater fat content in the salad dressing.

 

Genotype

(rs1527483)

Phenotype

Recommendations

CC[Advantage] More likely to have better fat taste perception
  • Less likely to overeat fat rich foods
CTModerate fat taste perception
  • Likely to overeat fatty foods
TT[Limitation] More likely to have lower fat taste perception
  • Highly likely to overeat fatty foods.
  • Practise mindful eating
  • Consciously lower intake of fat rich foods

 

Genotype

(rs1761667)

Phenotype

Recommendations

GG[Advantage] More likely to have better fat taste perception
  • Less likely to overeat fat rich foods
AGModerate fat taste perception
  • Likely to overeat fatty foods
AA[Limitation] More likely to have lower fat taste perception
  • Highly likely to overeat fatty foods.
  • Practise mindful eating
  • Consciously lower intake of fat rich foods

 

Association with Vitamin E Needs:

In a study conducted to identify the variability in vitamin E levels, CD36 gene variants were shown to be associated with differences in inter individual vitamin E levels, which may be due to its association with vitamin E uptake.  In the study it was found that adolescents who carried the GG genotype of rs1984112, GG genotype of rs1761667 (G allele), or AA genotype of rs1527479 were associated with lower plasma α-tocopherol concentrations.

 

Genotype

(rs1761667)

Phenotype

Recommendations

GG[Limitation] More likely to have lower vitamin E levels
  • Likely to need more Vitamin E in the diet
  • Meet the daily requirement for vitamin E- 10mg/day for men and 7mg/day for women
  • Eat Vitamin E rich foods like spinach, almonds, sweet potato, sunflower seeds and butter nut squash
AGModerate Vitamin E levels
  • Likely to need more vitamin E in the diet
AA[Advantage] More likely to have higher vitamin E levels
  • Likely to have normal levels of vitamin E in the diet

 

Genotype

(rs1984112)

Phenotype

Recommendations

GG[Limitation] More likely to have lower vitamin E levels
  • Likely to have lower levels of vitamin E
  • Meet the daily requirement for vitamin E- 10mg/day for men and 7mg/day for women
  • Eat Vitamin E rich foods like spinach, almonds, sweet potato, sunflower seeds and butter nut squash
AGModerate vitamin E levels
AA[Advantage] More likely to have higher vitamin E levels
  • Likely to have normal levels of vitamin E

 

Genotype

(rs1527479)

Phenotype

Recommendations

TT[Limitation] More likely to have lower vitamin E levels
  • Likely to have lower levels of vitamin E
  • Meet the daily requirement for vitamin E- 10mg/day for men and 7mg/day for women
  • Eat Vitamin E rich foods like spinach, almonds, sweet potato, sunflower seeds and butter nut squash
CTModerate vitamin E levels
CC[Advantage] More likely to have higher vitamin E levels
  • Likely to have normal levels of vitamin E

 

References:

  1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CD36
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4377901/
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25803547
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21228269

Related Links:

https://www.xcode.in/dna-and-health/know-genes-ttpa-vitamin-e-gene

Find out which variation of the gene you carry and more at www.xcode.in

“Nutrigenetics, fitness genetics, health genetics are all nascent but rapidly growing areas within human genetics. The information provided herein is based on preliminary scientific studies and it is to be read and understood in that context.”

Amrita Surendranath
Amrita Surendranath
Amrita has a Masters in Human Genetics which fuelled her passion for genes and their diktats. She loves converting genetic research into exciting scientific news with a punch. 10 years on, her interesting insights have covered a range of topics that include cancer, diabetes, nutrition, fitness and more. A pulse on what’s interesting aids in decoding laboratory data into useful science that could empower people into molding healthier lifestyles.